Average, Normal, and Regular

Right now, by all accounts, I should have 1.2 kids, be $10,000 in credit card debt, and have had two major car accidents by now. But not one of these is right.

Numbers and stats work on averages. You pay the insurance premiums you do because of averages. How often does your "type" of person have a car accident? How many years sooner does a smoker die than a non smoker? If you're under 25 and male, you are throw in with a pack of reckless idiots, who by their car insurance premiums, must have caused every car accident ever known.

I shave my head because I am going bald and "one size fits all" doesn't when it comes to baseball caps.

I make money from one of my credit cards. It gives miles back. I run it up and pay it off monthly. The average person doesn't. The average person leaves a balance and his interest eats up all of the miles he earned. He is essentially paying me with his "average" mistake. And by not being average with my credit card, I make money where the general population loses it.

Poker is a game of chance, yet the same names always show at the last table of the World Series of Poker.

The average affiliate marketer make less than $100 a year. The average blogger quits after a month. I didn't look those up, but they're pretty close. All this says to me is that being average sucks.

But the numbers can stop you in your tracks. They used to stop me. Until I realized it was a choice. I can listen to the numbers and choose to be average or just stop listening when statistics come into play.

The average is where normal people stop. To be more than that, you just have to take one step over the line. And then the numbers start working for you. You will make money by using a credit card. You will learn enough about statistics to play better than average poker. You will be blogging on day 32. And you will find a way around the fact that no one makes clothes that fit you.


Stephan Miller

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Kansas City Software Engineer and Author

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