A Constant Brain Change

After I finished high school I made it a goal of mine not to ever stop learning. I wasn't going to be able to afford the college degree, but I was willing to take the risk that learning itself would have value even if I didn't have the official paperwork to prove I learned something.

At first, I wasn't picky. I had a lot of time and no social life. I read whatever I felt like. Sometimes a subject would interest me to the point that I exhausted every book I found that referenced the field. Other times I would not finish the first book.

As time got shorter, I chose books that would teach me how to make money. I studied all of them I could find. It was time to put knowledge to work.

Now as my free time is almost non-existent, I have discovered audio books and finish one about every week just in the drive to and from work. I am learning something new everyday still and beats trying to find a quiet place at home to read a few pages here and there.

The thing I discovered is this. You do keep the education with you. It's in there somewhere. But I also discovered that the constantly learning puts my brain in a constant state of change. A state where anything is possible, because it is always changing. As I am listening to a book about making money, I see the potential of money everywhere. As I listen to a book about getting my stuff in order, there seems to be no end to streamlining my work. My mind becomes set on whatever I am currently listening to. It is like software for the brain.

If I stop every once and a while to look over my current strengths and weaknesses, I can get a good idea of the book or books I need to read or listen to next. And while I read the new book, I become a convert to whatever the author is teaching me. This may change later as I read other books, but during the book, I make every effort to suspend all disbelief and take it at face value.

Eventually all the books I have read mix together and become part of my thinking. And the constant barrage of information has taught me that nothing is perfect, no system, no way of life, no way of thinking. Everything evolves or gets replaced. It has also taught me that the word impossible is only spoken by the type of person I never want to be.


Stephan Miller

Written by

Kansas City Software Engineer and Author

Twitter | Github | LinkedIn

Updated